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Scaling in Forex Trading: The Advantages Of Not Getting Too Heavy Too Fast

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  • Scaling in Forex Trading: The Advantages Of Not Getting Too Heavy Too Fast

    A lot goes into building a forex strategy that can produce pips consistently and under a variety of market conditions. Rookie traders have long checklists of issues they need to address before trading for real capital and priority number one should be selecting a trading strategy. Once you nail down that issue, tasks like selecting a broker, a time of day to trade, what currencies to focus on and other issues will seem tame by comparison.

    For more seasoned forex traders, strategies evolve and change as the trader gains more experience and attains higher levels of success. With that, we're going to take a look at an element of forex trading strategy that many traders overlook at their own peril: Scaling into and out of a trade. This is not an issue reserved for veteran traders, although it may appear to be just that.

    Smart rookie traders will start learning how to scale into and out of a position while they're trading in a demo or simulated account then take those lessons with them to a mini account and on to a standard forex account. Of course, if you trade just one lot on every trade, you don't have to worry about scaling, but we'll assume that at some point your level of comfort with the forex market will grow to the point where you want to trade more lots. After all, more lots can mean more pips.

    Let's take a further look at the benefits of scaling into a trade. Let's assume you've opened a standard forex account with 50:1 leverage with $10,000 in initial capital. That means you've got
    $500,000 to trade with, or you can purchase up to five standard lots at one time. Imagine opening a trade with all of your capital committed to that single trade. Each pip on a standard lot equals $10, so a trade would have to go against you by 1,000 pips to blow out your account, but with five lots, a 200-pip move would decimate your account.

    We're not saying you'd allow that to happen. Most traders would get out before absorbing a
    200-pip loss, but you see what we're saying. Putting all your ammunition into one trade at one time is stressful. The smart trader scales in, then he scales out as profits are locked in. Let's say you buy one lot of EUR/USD at 1.4566. As the Euro moves up, you see your bullish inclination was right and you buy another lot at 1.4570 and then another at 1.4574 and so on until all five of your lots are occupied.

    In an ideal setting, you would be purchasing at higher prices, but only as the Euro moved up, confirming your initial bullishness. So while your average price has moved up, so has your profit potential because you've increased the size of your position. Now it's time to get out, and ideally you would be
    selling into continued bullishness. You don't sell all five lots at the same time unless there is a strong trend reversal signal.

    The smart trader might sell one lot 15 pips in the money, so he locks in
    $150, then another lot five pips later. There's a quick $350 and that practically guarantees a profitable trade and now you're playing with the house's money. Scaling in reduces your risk profile and scaling out lets your winners run and that's the right way to trade forex.

  • #2
    Originally posted by amanda View Post
    A lot goes into building a forex strategy that can produce pips consistently and under a variety of market conditions. Rookie traders have long checklists of issues they need to address before trading for real capital and priority number one should be selecting a trading strategy. Once you nail down that issue, tasks like selecting a broker, a time of day to trade, what currencies to focus on and other issues will seem tame by comparison.

    For more seasoned forex traders, strategies evolve and change as the trader gains more experience and attains higher levels of success. With that, we're going to take a look at an element of forex trading strategy that many traders overlook at their own peril: Scaling into and out of a trade. This is not an issue reserved for veteran traders, although it may appear to be just that.

    Smart rookie traders will start learning how to scale into and out of a position while they're trading in a demo or simulated account then take those lessons with them to a mini account and on to a standard forex account. Of course, if you trade just one lot on every trade, you don't have to worry about scaling, but we'll assume that at some point your level of comfort with the forex market will grow to the point where you want to trade more lots. After all, more lots can mean more pips.

    Let's take a further look at the benefits of scaling into a trade. Let's assume you've opened a standard forex account with 50:1 leverage with $10,000 in initial capital. That means you've got
    $500,000 to trade with, or you can purchase up to five standard lots at one time. Imagine opening a trade with all of your capital committed to that single trade. Each pip on a standard lot equals $10, so a trade would have to go against you by 1,000 pips to blow out your account, but with five lots, a 200-pip move would decimate your account.

    We're not saying you'd allow that to happen. Most traders would get out before absorbing a
    200-pip loss, but you see what we're saying. Putting all your ammunition into one trade at one time is stressful. The smart trader scales in, then he scales out as profits are locked in. Let's say you buy one lot of EUR/USD at 1.4566. As the Euro moves up, you see your bullish inclination was right and you buy another lot at 1.4570 and then another at 1.4574 and so on until all five of your lots are occupied.

    In an ideal setting, you would be purchasing at higher prices, but only as the Euro moved up, confirming your initial bullishness. So while your average price has moved up, so has your profit potential because you've increased the size of your position. Now it's time to get out, and ideally you would be
    selling into continued bullishness. You don't sell all five lots at the same time unless there is a strong trend reversal signal.

    The smart trader might sell one lot 15 pips in the money, so he locks in
    $150, then another lot five pips later. There's a quick $350 and that practically guarantees a profitable trade and now you're playing with the house's money. Scaling in reduces your risk profile and scaling out lets your winners run and that's the right way to trade forex.
    Yes it’s very important that we settle down to right strategy because this is something that can help us gain profits consistently, but now just suppose if we don’t have good strategy then we will never be able to make it far. I really like the way you explained things, it really reminds me of my broker OctaFX, it’s also very good at helping new comers with various options especially cTrader demo contest where we can practice regularly not just to learn, but also to win prizes.

    Comment


    • #3
      Each one of the traders we have a choice of the broker to be used, the trader can pick a broker which is all the more fitting to trading that will be used if you value doing scalping should pick the broker that grants trading thought, for instance, this. Like I pick FreshForex who doesn't bind any kind of strategy to use.
      Else it will be harder to survive, fundamentally paying little heed to a productive trading approach scalping don't allow all-around coordinated trading stages in their trading brokers. My broker offers in excess of 45 currency pairs for your own hypothesis and trading choices. I have been trading the latest couple of months. the best organization gave by this broker.

      Comment

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